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Fitzwilliam Private Hospital,

Milton Way, South Bretton
Peterborough, Cambridgeshire, PE3 9AQ


Secretary: Alison Hill -

        Phone: 07533 567161
        Email:
alison.hill22@nhs.net

Dr Manaan Kar Ray
Home About Me Services Conditions Interact Contact
MBBS, MRCPsych, MS (Psychotherapy), Msc (Psychiatry)

1.6 million people in the UK are affected by an Eating Disorder


Antidepressants like Fluoxetine are effective in Bulimia

Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has been shown to be effective

Key Facts

Dr. Kar Ray has extensive experience in the management of Bulimia Nervosa.

Royal College

Eating Disorders

Anorexia Nervosa

Bulimia Nervosa

1.6 million people in the UK are affected by an eating disorder. Eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are serious mental health problems but help is available and with the right treatment patients are able to overcome the disorder.




Eating disorders are characterised by an abnormal attitude towards food that causes someone to change their eating habits and behaviour.


A person with an eating disorder may focus excessively on their weight and shape, leading them to make unhealthy choices about food with damaging results to their health.

Types of eating disorders

Eating disorders include a range of conditions that can affect someone physically, psychologically and socially. The most common eating disorders are:


Some people, particularly young people, may be diagnosed with an eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS). This is means you have some, but not all, of the typical signs of eating disorders such as anorexia or bulimia.

What causes eating disorders?

Eating disorders usually have underlying causes. For example, if you are a teenager, hormone changes and lack of confidence, or problems





What treatments are there for eating disorders?

Self-help
There are a number of self-help books available in the shops. You can use these on your own, with a friend or with help from your GP or practice nurse. These books can be very helpful in describing strategies for improving your eating habits. They are generally written by medical experts but draw on the experience of people who have eating disorders.


Some people find that these books are a useful first stage in getting help. They can teach you about some of the ways of dealing with your eating disorder and they can also get you used to reading about or discussing problems which you have previously kept completely to yourself.


Help from carers
If someone you care about has an eating disorder, or is starting to show some of the symptoms, it is important that you let them know you are available for any help or support they ask for. You can offer suggestions, such as reading about the condition or joining a self-help group, but they have to make the decisions or their fear of being controlled will increase.


Help from a doctor
The first stage for many people with an eating disorder will be to talk to their family doctor (GP). Your doctor may not be an expert in treating eating disorders, but he/she will be able to assess any physical problems resulting from your eating disorder and can also help you to contact specialist eating disorder services.


Specialist help
The most successful treatment for eating disorders in the longer term may be by talking to a specialist who can help with your emotional needs and can help you take control of your eating. ‘
Talking treatments’ such as counselling or cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) are generally considered to be the most effective way of treating eating disorders because they deal with the deeper emotional issues rather than simply with the obvious problems.

Private Clinic:

Fitzwilliam Private Hospital, Milton Way, South Bretton, Peterborough, Cambridgeshire, PE3 9AQ

NHS base:

Elizabeth House, Fulbourn Hospital, Fulbourn, Cambridge, CB21 5EF

Dr. Kar Ray’s Profile

NHS Responsibilites: Consultant Psychiatrist and Clinical Director at Fulbourn Hospital, Cambridge

Fulbourn Hospital. Interior shot of the hospital with female nursing attendants in their pristine uniform c.1890s

Basic and Specialist Training in Psychiatry from Oxford Deanery based at the Warneford Hospital, Oxford

Neuroimaging research experience while working at the Dept of Psychiatry, Oxford University.

Private Secretary:

Alison Hill - 07533 567161

alison.hill22@nhs.net

such as bullying or difficulties with schoolwork, can trigger the conditions. Refusing or bingeing on food may make you feel you have some control over your life.


Some people attribute eating disorders to media and fashion. It is fashionable in western culture to be slim. This is not possible for everyone as we are naturally all different shapes and sizes. People with eating disorders very often feel that they can only ever be happy or successful if they can be more like images portrayed in the media.

Do I have an eating disorder?

Doctors sometimes use a questionnaire called the SCOFF questionnaire to help recognise people who may have an eating disorder. This involves asking the following five questions:

If you answer “yes” to two or more of these questions, you may have an eating disorder.