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Fitzwilliam Private Hospital,

Milton Way, South Bretton
Peterborough, Cambridgeshire, PE3 9AQ


Secretary: Alison Hill -

        Phone: 07533 567161
        Email:
alison.hill22@nhs.net

Dr Manaan Kar Ray
Home About Me Services Conditions Interact Contact
MBBS, MRCPsych, MS (Psychotherapy), Msc (Psychiatry)

GAD affects about 1 in 20 adults in Britain.




Antidepressants are effective in treating anxiety, they increase brain serotonin.

Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, Problem Solving, Guided Self Help, Counselling

Key Facts

Anxiety disorders are highly treatable, yet only about one-third of those suffering receive treatment.


Royal College

Generalized Anxiety Disorder

Anxiety disorders are highly treatable, yet only about one-third of those suffering receive treatment.


Generalized anxiety disorder is characterized by persistent, excessive, and unrealistic worry about everyday things.

People with the disorder, which is also referred to as GAD, experience exaggerated worry and tension, often expecting the worst, even when there is no apparent reason for concern. They anticipate disaster and are overly concerned about money, health, family, work, or other issues. GAD is diagnosed when a person worries excessively about a variety of everyday problems for at least 6 months.


Sometimes just the thought of getting through the day produces anxiety. They don’t know how to stop the worry cycle and feel it is beyond their control, even though they usually realize that their anxiety is more intense than the situation warrants.


The disorder comes on gradually and can begin across the life cycle, though the risk is highest between childhood and middle age. Although the exact cause of GAD is unknown, there is evidence that biological factors, family background, and life experiences, particularly stressful ones, play a role.

When their anxiety level is mild, people with GAD can function socially and be gainfully employed. Although they may avoid some situations because they have the disorder, some people can have difficulty carrying out the simplest daily activities when their anxiety is severe.


Generalized anxiety disorder is the most common anxiety disorder to affect older adults.


To Cope with Anxiety, Remember A-W-A-R-E


The key to switching out of an anxiety state is to accept it fully. Remaining in the present and accepting your anxiety cause it to disappear.


A: Accept the anxiety. Welcome it. Don’t fight it. Replace your rejection, anger, and hatred of it with acceptance. By resisting, you’re prolonging the unpleasantness of it. Instead, flow with it. Don’t make it responsible for how you think, feel, and act.


W: Watch your anxiety. Look at it without judgment – not good, not bad. Rate it on a 0-to-10 scale and watch it go up and down. Be detached. Remember, you’re not your anxiety. The more you can separate yourself from the experience, the more you can just watch it.


A: Act with the anxiety. Act as if you aren’t anxious. Function with it. Slow down if you have to, but keep going. Breathe slowly and normally. If you run from the situation your anxiety will go down, but your fear will go up. If you stay, both your anxiety and your fear will go down.


R: Repeat the steps. Continue to accept your anxiety, watch it, and act with it until it goes down to a comfortable level. And it will. Just keep repeating these three steps: accept, watch, and act with it.


E: Expect the best. What you fear the most rarely happens. Recognize that a certain amount of anxiety is normal. By expecting future anxiety you’re putting yourself in a good position to accept it when it comes again.


Adapted from: Anxiety Disorders and Phobias: A Cognitive Perspective, by Aaron Beck and Gary Emery




Private Clinic:

Fitzwilliam Private Hospital, Milton Way, South Bretton, Peterborough, Cambridgeshire, PE3 9AQ

NHS base:

Elizabeth House, Fulbourn Hospital, Fulbourn, Cambridge, CB21 5EF

Dr. Kar Ray’s Profile

NHS Responsibilites: Consultant Psychiatrist and Clinical Director at Fulbourn Hospital, Cambridge

Fulbourn Hospital. Interior shot of the hospital with female nursing attendants in their pristine uniform c.1890s

Basic and Specialist Training in Psychiatry from Oxford Deanery based at the Warneford Hospital, Oxford

Neuroimaging research experience while working at the Dept of Psychiatry, Oxford University.

Private Secretary:

Alison Hill - 07533 567161

alison.hill22@nhs.net

The difference between "normal" worry and GAD

Worries, doubts, and fears are a normal part of life. It’s natural to be anxious about your upcoming SAT test or to worry about your finances after being hit by unexpected bills.


The difference between “normal” worrying and generalized anxiety disorder is that the worrying involved in GAD is:


For example, after watching a news report about a terrorist bombing in the Middle East, the average person might feel a temporary sense of unease and worry. If you have GAD, however, you might be up all night afterwards, then continue worrying for days about a worst-case scenario in which your small hometown is attacked.


Physical symptoms of GAD include muscle tension, fatigue, restlessness, difficulty sleeping, irritability, edginess and gastrointestinal discomfort or diarrhea.