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Fitzwilliam Private Hospital,

Milton Way, South Bretton
Peterborough, Cambridgeshire, PE3 9AQ


Secretary: Alison Hill -

        Phone: 07533 567161
        Email:
alison.hill22@nhs.net

Dr Manaan Kar Ray
Home About Me Services Conditions Interact Contact
MBBS, MRCPsych, MS (Psychotherapy), Msc (Psychiatry)

1 in 100 will be diagnosed with Schizophrenia


Number of effective antipsychotics to treat Schizophrenia

Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has been shown to be effective

Key Facts

Dr. Kar Ray has extensive experience in the management of Schizophrenia.

Royal College


Schizophrenia


Schizophrenia can be frightening, but it doesn't have to define your life. With medication, therapy, and support, many people with schizophrenia are able to control their symptoms, gain greater independence, and lead fulfilling lives.



Schizophrenia is a challenging disorder that makes it difficult to distinguish between what is real and unreal, think clearly, manage emotions, relate to others, and function normally. But that doesn't mean there isn't hope. Schizophrenia can be successfully managed. The first step is to identify the signs and symptoms. The second step is to seek help without delay and the third is to stick with the treatment. With the right treatment and support, a person with schizophrenia can lead a happy, fulfilling life.


Schizophrenia is a brain disorder that affects the way a person acts, thinks, and sees the world. People with schizophrenia have an altered perception of reality, often a significant loss of contact with reality. They may see or hear things that don’t exist, speak in strange or confusing ways, believe that others are trying to harm them, or feel like they’re being constantly watched. With such a blurred line between the real and the imaginary, schizophrenia makes it difficult—even frightening—to negotiate the activities of daily life. In response, people with schizophrenia may withdraw from the outside world or act out in confusion and fear.

Most cases of schizophrenia appear in the late teens or early adulthood. However, schizophrenia can appear for the first time in middle age or even later. In rare cases, schizophrenia can even affect young children and adolescents, although the symptoms are slightly different. In general, the earlier schizophrenia develops, the more severe it is. Schizophrenia also tends to be more severe in men than in women.

Although schizophrenia is a chronic disorder, there is help available. With support, medication, and therapy, many people with schizophrenia are able to function independently and live satisfying lives. However, the outlook is best when schizophrenia is diagnosed and treated right away. If you spot the signs and symptoms of schizophrenia and seek help without delay, you or your loved one can take advantage of the many treatments available and improve the chances of recovery.






Signs and symptoms: There are five types of symptoms characteristics: delusions, hallucinations, disorganized speech, disorganized behavior, and the so-called “negative” symptoms. However, the signs and symptoms of schizophrenia vary dramatically from person to person, both in pattern and severity. Not every person with schizophrenia will have all symptoms, and the symptoms of schizophrenia may also change over time.

Delusions: A delusion is a firmly-held idea that a person has despite clear and obvious evidence that it isn’t true. Delusions are extremely common in schizophrenia, occurring in more than 90% of those who have the disorder. Often, these delusions involve illogical or bizarre ideas or fantasies.

Hallucinations: Hallucinations are sounds or other sensations experienced as real when they exist only in the person's mind. While hallucinations can involve any of the five senses, auditory hallucinations (e.g. hearing voices or some other sound) are most common.


Disorganized speech: Fragmented thinking is characteristic of schizophrenia. Externally, it can be observed in the way a person speaks. People with schizophrenia tend to have trouble concentrating and maintaining a train of thought. They may respond to queries with an unrelated answer, start sentences with one topic and end somewhere completely different, speak incoherently, or say illogical things.

Disorganized behavior: Schizophrenia disrupts goal-directed activity, causing impairments in a person’s ability to take care of him or herself, work, and interact with others.

Negative symptoms The so-called “negative” symptoms of schizophrenia refer to the absence of normal behaviors found in healthy individuals. They include lack of emotional expression, lack of interest or enthusiasm or interest in the world, speech difficulties.

There are three major subtypes of schizophrenia, each classified by their most prominent symptom:





Private Clinic:

Fitzwilliam Private Hospital, Milton Way, South Bretton, Peterborough, Cambridgeshire, PE3 9AQ

NHS base:

Elizabeth House, Fulbourn Hospital, Fulbourn, Cambridge, CB21 5EF

Dr. Kar Ray’s Profile

NHS Responsibilites: Consultant Psychiatrist and Clinical Director at Fulbourn Hospital, Cambridge

Fulbourn Hospital. Interior shot of the hospital with female nursing attendants in their pristine uniform c.1890s

Basic and Specialist Training in Psychiatry from Oxford Deanery based at the Warneford Hospital, Oxford

Neuroimaging research experience while working at the Dept of Psychiatry, Oxford University.

Private Secretary:

Alison Hill - 07533 567161

alison.hill22@nhs.net

Common misconceptions about schizophrenia

MYTH: Schizophrenia refers to a "split personality" or multiple personalities.

FACT: Multiple personality disorder is a different and much less common disorder than schizophrenia. People with schizophrenia do not have split personalities. Rather, they are “split off” from reality.

 

MYTH: Schizophrenia is a rare condition.

FACT: Schizophrenia is not rare; the lifetime risk of developing schizophrenia is widely accepted to be around 1 in 100.

 

MYTH: People with schizophrenia are dangerous.

FACT: Although the delusional thoughts and hallucinations of schizophrenia sometimes lead to violent behavior, most people with schizophrenia are neither violent nor a danger to others.

 

MYTH: People with schizophrenia can’t be helped.

FACT: While long-term treatment may be required, the outlook for schizophrenia is not hopeless. When treated properly, many people with schizophrenia are able to enjoy life and function within their families and communities.